Rob Parker Strikes Again!

5 12 2011

Image

A few months back, I wrote a little piece on the bias of a certain ESPN writer on the way Jose Reyes finished his 2011 season. Today, I’ve come across another one of Rob Parker’s gems, this time suggesting that Mets fans should blame Mets ownership and the front office for the departure of Jose Reyes and his signing with the Miami Marlins. You did get one thing right, though, Rob. I don’t blame Jose Reyes. But I don’t blame Mets ownership and the front office, either. Instead, I blame the Players Union, Owners (collectively), and Bud Selig. Why? Simple. Have you seen the absurd contracts players are signing in this ‘so-called’ recession? $106 Million for 6 years? Who deserves that? Did he find a cure for cancer or something? Did he stop a world war? Did he invent something revolutionary? So no, I don’t blame Mets ownership and the front office for Reyes signing a contract he would have never received from the Mets. I blame the union, owners, and Selig for letting contracts get so incredibly out of hand, that the Mets ‘forcibly’ had no chance at re-signing Jose Reyes.

But I digress… I’m going to enjoy disecting this one! Shall we?

No matter what the final numbers are, the bottom line remains that the Mets were kidding themselves when they failed to deal Reyes before the trading deadline to get some quality players in return

And your entire write-up lost all credibility right there. Kaput. Gone with the wind. Would you have taken a chance on Reyes as a GM when he was just coming off of an injury… twice? There’s so much risk associated with Reyes that it didn’t seem worth it for owners to want to make a move for him. Try again.

Coming into the season, if the Mets weren’t sure what to do with Reyes — trade him or try to re-sign him — it should have been crystal clear after Reyes wasn’t interested in the Mets’ money. Hence, the Mets should have traded Reyes for the best package available. It only made sense.

See previous response. Best package available? You’re joking, right? He just comes off of an injury, and you think teams are going to give the Mets a great offer? Better yet, you think the Mets should’ve just traded him for anything? This isn’t MLB2KWhatever, Rob. You can’t turn your ‘trade settings’ off.

The Mets have made many mistakes since 1986, their last championship season. One of the biggest is not dealing players when their stock is sky high. Too often, they wait until it’s too late and don’t get full value. This time, the Mets simply blew it. This one will hurt.

Care to enlighten me on this theory of not dealing ‘high stock’ players before it’s too late? And this will hurt? On the contrary. This one will counter the $70 million the team lost this past year, and make player-based decisions a little easier on the financial front. If you think this Mets fan is ‘hurt’ by Reyes signing with the “I love buying championships and disbanding” Marlins, then you’re severely out-of-touch with the fanbase you grew up so close to.

Once again, you’ve proven to know nothing about the fanbase. None of your Mets-related writeups make any sense, have any solid points, and read as if the point is to mindlessly bash the Mets. Bravo, Rob.

Stay Classy.





Major League Greedball: Manny being… you know…

8 04 2011

Thank you, Manny Ramirez, for taking some attention off of the Mets (even if it’s just for today) after they lost to the Nationals today. Dickey looked a little lost on the hill while Zimmermann pulled a ‘Josh Johnson’, the bullpen was equally as spotty, and while sports writers are eating it all up… you decided to call it quits. Thank you, Manny Ramirez. Thank you.

If I really cared about Manny, I’d probably ask a few simple questions like:

Why, Manny Ramirez, would you call it quits so abruptly? You couldn’t help yourself? You stayed with the ‘program’ and were so close to really starting fresh again. So instead of growing a pair (which I’m sure is hard, being that they’re probably the size of raisins by now), you decide to walk away and call it quits like a coward? That’s quite the example you’ve just set. For all of the charities you’ve ever been involved in… For all of the community events you’ve been a part of with the teams you’ve played for… For all of the children and those who dream of walking in the footsteps of some of the greats… You really set quite an example with your cowardly decision.

But I don’t care about Manny. He was caught a second time and instead of being open and honest, another one bites the dust. He’s just another athlete who thought he could cheat the system, and when the system came knocking, he opted into the witness protection program. Typical, cowardly, and forgettable.

Did I mention the Mets looked silly against the Nationals today as they walked 9 batters and… I mean… Steroids McNeedle retired today! Thanks, Manny!





Major League Greedball – A New Outlook

12 04 2008

Jose Canseco

Last month, I wrote a pretty bad, yet cheesy, poem about Jose Canseco, and what I thought about his ‘name calling’ in his books and interviews. I made up my mind about him from the beginning, and never gave his word a chance. But that changed today, when I finally gave in and bought one of his books. I bought his newest release, ‘Vindicated’, from a Penn Station bookstore that was selling it at 20% off (not that the discount is what led me to buy it). It was time for me to give ‘Jose’ another chance. After all, my former opinion of his ‘allegations’ and ‘name calling’ was mostly fueled by the media bigwigs at ESPN or CNNSI, instead of my own cerebrally-formed opinion. So, here it goes.

[Start of ‘Bizarre Story’ Break]

I was riding the LIRR with my girlfriend, on our way to visit my grandparents, when a whole bunch of Mets fans got on the train at Woodside (I say Mets fans because they all had Johan Santana jerseys on). One of them caught a glimpse of what I was reading, and said down at me, “What does it say about A-Rod?“. I ignored him, and kept on reading, because I wasn’t about to get into a conversation with a guy on his way to a baseball game who already looked drunk (at 11:00am, mind you). He turned to a friend of his and continued by saying, “This kid is reading that Canseco book. Man, @&#% Canseco… and @$&% A-rod too“. Kid? Amazing how an 18 year old “kid” calls a 26 year old a kid (I know he was 18 because a friend of his had said “you’re NOT drinking at the game, you’re only 18”). Okay, how in the world would he know I’m 26 anyway… but that’s besides the point. Back to the post…

[End of ‘Bizarre Story’ Break]

I’m not going to give away the meat of the book, because I believe everyone (who has an interest in this topic) should buy the book and give it a chance. The guy is simply recalling his life, from start to present day. Sure, he names a bunch of players and recalls a lot of conversations, but that’s purely secondary to what he really talks about in the book. The majority of this new book was focused on two things (at least from what I took from the book):

A) Why steroids and performance enhancing drugs were kept so ‘quiet’ during the post ‘Strike of 1994’ years of baseball. (I happened to have the same ‘theories’ that he had)
B)
How steroids created a ‘Level Playing Field’. (That’s where I was a little skeptical)

My opinion on Jose’s claims haven’t change dramatically, but simply looking at what he has to say (lie-detector passed and all) has given me a whole bunch of new theories to rack my brain with. I will agree with him on this, though. “Chicks Dig The Longball”. How many of you remember that commercial with Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine, and Big Mac? Jose made a reference to that commercial in the book, and how it was a funny reference to the state of baseball back in the (now referred to as the ‘Juiced’) era. Fans (and sports coverage hounds like ESPN and others) love the home run ball. Whether it’s a solo shot, a grand slam, or a game-winner… there’s something about the ball being crushed into the next atmosphere that gives baseball fans an incredible rush. After reading this book, I’m starting to believe in the idea that Steroid use was kept quiet because it kept fans (notice I didn’t say ‘all fans’) in their seats, buying more tickets, buying more food/alcohol, and fueling the baseball economy.

None of this means I’m a believer in everything Jose says. What it means, is that I was knowingly hand-fed media garbage and used their opinions as my own. I accepted it without questioning it, and now I want my own opinion back.

So what have I learned from all this? While I never did know a whole lot about Jose Canseco, his book has given me some neat theories to play around with. Thanks Jose!

Believe what you want. Believe who you want. We’ll all believe who we want and what we want. It’s our god-given right to do so. But me? After all of the ‘Canseco Nay-Saying’ I did? I’m glad he opened his big mouth. Then again, the media-opinion-hungry kid on the inside wants this guy to fade away into the darkness that is the “Steroid Era” and never been heard from or seen again, along with everyone else involved. But then I’d just be a media-puppet… and we all know that’s no fun!

Respect My Authoritah!





Major League Greedball – Dodger Blues

10 04 2008

That’s right, kiddies! If you’re a Dodger fan (or just a fan of baseball) living in Los Angeles, and you can’t afford Field Level Box Seats at Dodger Stadium, your pre-game autograph days are over! T.J. Simers over at the Los Angeles Times wrote an article about Dodger Stadiums latest rule. According to this new rule, only fans with tickets to Field Level seating will have access to pre-game autograph opportunities that most fans of other teams have. If you read T.J.’s article, you’ll read about one fan’s stadium experience after being turned away after the new rule took effect, while his seats were just outside of the Field Level Box Seats. As a fan of the game in New York City(aside from being a Mets fan), I’m always psyched to head to Shea Stadium about two and a half hours before games to chat with players and grab some autographs. It’s something I’ve done since first going to Mets games as a kid, and it’s something I’m looking forward to doing with my future kids.

Dodger Stadium
If you look closely, you can see the Field Level ushers turning people away even with the game already in progress!

How can a storied organization like the Dodgers turn away not only the adult fans, but the children (whose family or friends can’t afford box seats) that come to ballgames hoping to get an autograph from one of their favorite player? Well, according to a Dodgers PR guy, an area in Center Field will is dubbed as “Autograph Alley”, where one former Dodger will sign autographs before every game. Ex-Dodgers like Lee Lacy and Jim Gott have already showed up to the centerfield area, where no current players are expected to venture out to before a game. But what 10-year-old wants Lee Lacy’s autograph? Wouldn’t he/she rather have Andruw Jones’ autograph? What about Brad Penny?

In a follow up article on the LA Times website by T.J. Simers, The Dodgers are awaiting ‘more data’ as they begin to reconsider the new rule, while fans have been pushing complaints through. If you have anything to tell the Dodgers Organization about this new rule, send an email over to fanfeedback@ladodgers.com and let the Dodgers PR people know exactly how you feel.

[Thanks, Veronique, for linking this post to the LA Times Blog!]

Welcome to the United States of America, where in Los Angeles, the dollar gets you autographs of your favorite athletes. Now get back to your “Reserved” seat, lower class citizen! If I were a Dodger Fan in Los Angeles, I’d be almost as mad as Phillip Wellman when he argues with umpires…





Major League Greedball – Arod and the Fish

2 04 2008

Arod Cigar

Doing my usual web-browsing for baseball news, I came across this Yahoo article on Alex Rodriguez and the Florida Marlins. The article had nothing to do with statistics or the game itself. It had to do with money. This article was about how Alex Rodriguez ($28 million) makes more money, annually, than the entire current roster of the Florida Marlins ($21.8).

If you’ve read my previous “Major League Greedball” post, you’d know my stance on the flow of money through sports, and where I believe it should really be going. I have nothing against Alex and his talents, or any other player in baseball and their talents, for that matter. I just have a hard time believing in the sport with so much money being dumped into it, when all that money could be going to more important places (in my opinion), like into the pockets of educators. Now, I’m not saying that highly paid players don’t give back to their communities. A lot of players have foundations, charities, or donate money because of a clause in their contract. That’s all wonderful and great. But at $28 million a year… if Arod doesn’t win any World Series rings as a Yankee, that’s one big waste of money, in my opinion.

I’ll feel a little better when the $21.8 million Florida Marlins make a playoff run… or will Jeff Loria sign a truck-full of high-priced Free Agents at the end of the season to win a World Series, and fire everyone when they finally win it? How very “Huizenga” of me to say…





Major League Greedball – Cabreraball

24 03 2008

This morning, I read an article on ESPN.com about another “big” signing in Major League Baseball. The Detroit Tigers are all set to sign newly acquired 3rd Baseman, Miguel Cabrera, to an 8-year contract worth $153.3 Million! If I wasn’t annoyed about salaries in professional sports, I am now. I’m not going to make any “Statistical” arguments about why nobody in baseball should make nearly that much. I’m going to make a more practical argument.

Everyday in this country, teachers are getting short-changed. Teaching is one of the most important professions in the world. I’m not a teacher, but I have a lot of friends who are, and who are struggling to make a living for themselves because they don’t make nearly as much as they deserve. What can a teacher do for you? A teacher can give you building blocks and motivate you to be whoever and do whatever you want to be successful. A teacher can show you that you should always reach for your dreams and goals. Education is so important in the growth of our children in this country, and all over the world. As a matter of fact, teachers are so important, that they could teach people like Rosanne Barr how NOT to sing the National Anthem like this…

I remember this… and I remember throwing up afterwards…

They could also give Ashlee Simpson’s sound guy come sound career advice when he screws things up for poor Miss Simpson…

“Saving her voice” my @ss. If she can’t hold her own on stage and resorts to ‘over-dubbing’, then she shouldn’t be performing live…

What kind of message does this Cabrera contract signing send towards the children of this country who need education and teachers? In my own opinion, it doesn’t send any positive messages towards the kids of America, except for a message of greed. Basically, if you can play baseball well, you’ll be rewarded with all the money you could dream of. So, play the game to get rich… because if you play the game unselfishly and because you love the game, you’ll end up making as much as a Tampa Bay Ray. (I still think of them as the Devil Rays)

When I see my elementary school, middle school, and high school teacher friends making as much as professional athletes, I’ll be more interested in the sport of baseball, and other professional sports, like I was when I was growing up. It’s one thing to earn a living, being a professional athlete. But to play the game for greed is a whole other story.

But on another note, as a Mets fan, I sure am glad to see Miguel in the American League. Happy Trails, Miguel!








%d bloggers like this: